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states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
that has something to doith iran and something else to do with the u.n. nuclear watchdog group called the iaea. just for some context here earlier this week we told you members of the iaea, which is the nuclear watchdog group for the u.n., getting their e-mails and information hacked. all signs pointed that iran was behind that. we also reported to you yesterday that the associated press has a diagram from supposedly inside iran that showed iran wanting to develop a nuclear weapon that would be three times as powerful as hiroshima. today what we're getting crossing on the wires right now the united states effectively set a march deadline for iran to start cooperating with the iaea and let the inspectors into the country for full access. the united states diplomat says if they do not do this, if iran does not start cooperating they are going to recommend that the u.n. security council take this up. now what that means and whether or not that is a credible threat to get iran to start working with this group is a big question. time will only tell. the timeline is of the utmost importance
news for you. in less than an hour from now the u.n. is set to take up a historic vote on the palestinians' bid for statehood. thousands of palestinians have already been celebrating in the streets of the west bank today. we'll fill you in. >>> plus, lunch at the white house. what we're learning about president obama and mitt romney's first face to face meeting since the election. >>> and hostess wants to give its top execs nearly $2 million worth of bonuses as thousands of workers are losing their jobs. join our conversation on twitter. find us @newsnation. [ "odd couple" theme plays ] humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> developing right now, we are about 45 minutes away from a united nations general assembly session that will result in a historic vote on palest
by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign. >> reporter: after meeting with rice for more than an hour, collins emerged questioning her judgment in giving the public what turned out to be incorrect information in the days after the deadly attack in benghazi. and the main republican was lukewarm about the prospect of rice as secretary of state. if president obama were to nominate susan rice to be the next secretary of state, could you support that nomination? >> i would need to have additional information before i could support her nomination. >> reporter: collins has gone out of her way to support rice in the past. even introducing rice family ties to maine at a confirmation hearing for u.n. ambassador. >> the people of maine are proud of what this remarkable woman has accomplished. >> reporter: whether collins supports rice now for a promotion is crucial because of the raw numbers. rice would likely need 60 votes to overcome a filibuster by these gop senators assuming all 55 sen
with you. 97 house republicans have sent a letter to the president to discourage him from nominating u.n. ambassador susan rice as secretary of state. and this follows andrea mitchell's reporting yesterday that it was the intelligence community, not the white house, that changed talking points about the unclassified data that could be discussed when susan rice went out on the sunday talk shows to discuss what was known about the benghazi situation. is that something that republicans are choosing to ignore, the facts of that? they're trying to draft a letter like this to almost wreck her reputation before she is even nominated. >> and frankly it doesn't matter what the house of representatives thinks. they have no say in the process. this is more of a headline scheme, frankly. this is press release politics, which is the last thing we need right now. but what is important is to look at the white house did put her out there. she did her job. i'll give her that. she spoke with the talking points she had, what she knew. the fact is the administration to put her out there with misleading info
have all of the arab rulers -- this guy named muammar gaddafi should go, and you had the u.n. security council resolution. those two are huge. it is, particularly when you are looking for legitimacy. -- it is hard, particularly when you are looking for legitimacy. the one thing we need to be careful about though is the conclusion that we have and grace democratic change and it is irreversible. which we have been braced -- the conclusion that we have been braced democratic change -- we have embraced democratic change. particularly after each. tahrir square. that was very different from the 9/11 paradigm. when you ask the american public's -- public is the uprising in the arab world driven by people looking for democracy or by arab groups, many square. people said it was ordinarily -- ordinary people like them. are they favorable or unfavorable, many had favorable reviews of the arab and muslim people. 70% expressed -- that has changed over the past year. what we see is really a change where you have more people saying the arab uprisings are more about people try to take control. now, th
haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since 1967 and really since not long after that when sadat, the relationship has been peaceful. it's been codified by treaty. it is the basis of peace in the middle east to the extent it exists at all. what this shows is we can no longer take that for granted. now that you've had the political change in egypt, you can't
aviv as hopes grow for a mediation effort led by the u.n. attorney general. back at home congressional leaders start a fiscal cliff conversation before a post election vacation. will they have anything to be thankful for when everyone gets back to work and the clock really starts ticking? good morning from washington. it's monday, november 19, 2012, and this is "the daily rundown." no, it's not chuck todd. the president is in cambodia this morning, his final stop on a three nation tour of southeast asia. after wrapping up the first trip to myanmar by a sitting u.s. president, chuck joins us now with the latest on the president's trip. >> well, good morning. i'm here in myanmar, a country that just a few years ago was virtually isolated from the world's community and now a united states president has visited the country, barack obama. he made a whirlwind 12 hours count when he landed and touched down he was greeted by a sea of folks here, some of them locals looked spontaneous. some of them uniformed schoolchildren, looked like it was very organized. but throngs of people hoping to catc
. but the person who is really taking the heat for that is our u.n. ambassador susan rice. you know, obviously there's been a lot of criticism of her. i think there's been a lot of attempts to make it clear she did exactly what anybody in her position would have done, with those talking points, given the situation we were in on that sunday when she went on the sunday shows. you know, some of the members of the congressional black caucus have raised the question, you know, would republicans be -- using a different tone if the ambassador -- the u.n. ambassador was white? here was senator graham's response. i want to play that and then let's talk about it. >> guys like you are being criticized by, for instance, members much the congressional black caucus, they say that you and john mccain are sexist and racists as well for criticizing ambassador rice. >> well, when you can't answer the question, you attack the questioner. the only color i'm worried about when it comes to benghazi is red, blood red. >> you know, congresswoman, i'll tell you what strikes me is i'm a little cautious about getting in
their own state, of course, and a vote by the u.n. today could actually put them one step closer to getting it. there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you could use less gel. and with androgel 1.62%, you can save on your monthly prescription. [ male announcer ] dosing and application sites between these products differ. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or, signs in a woman which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are, or may become pregnant or are breast feeding should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count
coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a true blue declaration of war through our own congress or even the fig leaf of congressional authorization that bush had? >> if they wanted to cut the funding, they could have cut the funding. they chose not to. they chose the posture -- tos chure because they knew obama was in the rights. >> we cannot manage outcomes in a foreign country. i am very afraid to teach you that. what is happen in the iran world is happening there. whether we like it or not. obama didn't like it. hillary clinton did not like it. and when we finally got around it to, it was a done deal. what we decided was not going to make any difference in egypt. as far as libya, you know, that one, at first, it seemed like we got lucky or excuse me, ka coffey went down easily. -- qaddafi went down easily. god only knows what's going to happen in syria. we sit here talking about oh, we're always going to do this. shiites believe that. oh, we can back in the sunnis here and there. this stuff, i spend a lot of time in that part of the world. it doesn't even make se
as the rebels pushed into the city. some 1,500 u.n. peacekeepers and armor stood aside, and did not try to block the advance. congo has accused neighboring rwanda of backing the rebels in an effort to control the region's mineral wealth. federal prosecutors in new york announced charges today in what could be the single biggest insider trading payoff ever. mathew martoma allegedly used confidential information about an alzheimer's drug to make more than a quarter-billion dollars. at the time, in 2006, he managed a hedge fund portfolio. for more, we turn to david voreacos of bloomberg news. >> thank you for having me. sreenivasan: first off how did this alleged scream work. what kind of information was being traded? >> well, the prosecutors today in new york allege that a hedge fund advisor at f.a.c. capital advisors in connecticut which is run by billiaire seve cohe gathered inside information about an alzheimers cli.$kal drug trial that was being conducted. based on that information he built a position of $700 million in the two drug companies that were running the trial. through his connection
of state in the second term of the obama administration, because according to john mccain, u.n. ambassador susan rice, who's a likely candidate for secretary of state, she once said something wrong on the sunday shows. in the days after the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, back in september, susan rice went on the sunday shows and gave the administration's intelligence agency-approved talking points, explaining what the administration thought at that time had happened in benghazi. and that, in john mccain's view, is unforgivable. >> maybe she could start out by publicly coming back on this show and saying, i was wrong. i gave the wrong information on your show some several weeks ago. that might be a beginning. >> but until then, john mccain will block her potential nomination. and anybody's nomination. no secretary of state for the united states of america until john mccain is satisfied. susan rice, for the record, did not give wrong information on the sunday shows. she described accurately what the intelligence agencies were advising her to say at that time. none of which turned
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
on the u.n. and elsewhere and sort of stopping or advancing certain causes is important. i think the president is sending out a clear signal his second term, while he's done this year domestically at home said okay republicans you want to play, time to play, i think he's saying beginning to say internationally, okay, i'm ready to move on to the international stage and stay and do things heretofor have not done. and to allies, supporters, friends we're with you. but opponents and those kind of neutral like china where we don't have, you know, a real -- >> we have a difficult -- we have a complicated and difficult relationship. >> that we want to uncomplicate it a little bit and you need to know where we stand. >> nick, you are an expert in many things but also the china question on a number of levels is a complicated one. what do you think this trip does for the chinese, apart from the blustery quote i just read? is this an effective way of dealing with them in terms of asserting american power in a different part of the world? >> there is a competition for southeast asia, burma,
writing a letter to president obama opposing the idea of nominating the current u.n. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, to secretary of state. it feels like on the domestic front we have a fiscal cliff and we're going to work things out, but there's still a lot of kind of opposition and you can hear in mccain's voice a dislike for where the president is heading. what does the republican party do now? cut deals? where do they go? we know where they went after 2008. they unified against obama. it worked for them in 2010. why did it not work in 2012? >> i think both sides will have to consolidate their bases. find out how much leeway each side has. and then they can come to the table and say, all right, can we raise rates or raise are revenue a little bit. can we cut -- how much can we cut entitlements? how much will the two sides be able to give and i think though you see in john boehner and in president obama two people who are willing to work together if they can get the wings, the fringe wings of either side to kind of get onboard and come together. >> you know, one
of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank you for being here on thanksgiving. >> good morning. >> you were also partly raised in the middle east. your father served in the foreign service. you've seen firsthand from a young age that cease-fires have a history of collapsing. do you feel this one is different? >> well, no, actually, they're very fragile in the middle east. these cycles can break down at any moment. but in this case, what you have is the emergence of a consensus that, you know, on the israeli side, the cost of a ground invasion was not something that they sought. and also, on the palestinian side, that, you know, israel has such a strong military superiority, that looking at a way to kind of get the talks restarted is really the outcome that people look for here. but in the middle east, the memories are long. of course, this is a cycle that's been going on for half
'm happy to have that discussion with them. but for them to go after the u.n. ambassador who had nothing to do with benghazi and was simply making a presentation based on intelligence that she had received and to besmirch her reputation is outrageous. >>. >> and the president drew a line on taxes saying revenue must come from people who make over $250,000. >> what have i'm not going to do is extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it, which would cost close to a trillion dollars. >> i want to bring in a columnist for the "washington post." good morning. let's start with you. over the next two days, congress is holding those closed hearings on libya. we saw a very strong defense on susan rice. do you think number one, we'll learn something from the hearings. do you think we'll hear a nomination for susan rice? >> well, it's the nomination that certainly seem to be what obama was hinting at yesterday, although he was clear he had not made the decision. that was an exthe record theirly strong defense in particular to accepting david petraeus' resignation so quickly. hopefully some
diplomats are coming to israel and to 9 region, not just the u.n. secretary-general, but the u.s. secretary of state as you've just said has been dispatched by president obama to meet face-to-face with the principles in this conflict. the prime minister of israel, the president of egypt who is taking the lead in organizing these cease-fire negotiations from the hamas side with israel. soledad? >> christiane, that sounds like the short-term option, right? you sort of try to hold everything down while you negotiate some kind of a short-term peace. what are people saying about the longer-term options here? >> well, you know, there's a lot of devil in the details, as always. you know, each side wants to make sure it's not just a short-term. it's a long-term option. because on the one hand, israel wants a long-term solution to the rockets that are being fired into israel, and into threatening the residents of that area of southern israel close to gaza. on the other hand, the hamas and the palestinians in gaza want a long-term solution to lifting the siege of gaza, and also want a promise, a pled
that in the '90s, we had several examples of massive united nations led interventions where the u.n. move in and establish a presence at a governance in iraq and afghanistan, it was u.s. and nato-led. but in the middle east and north africa particularly in these three countries we were discussing, something new is happening. this is the international community learning how to do things different. we are not going back to what we've done in the last 20 years. we're going to do this in a different way. and i think as an international community where learning what that processes. if you on the ground you can see. there's a lot of things going on, a lot of people there but there's a hesitancy about this intervention. and this involvement. that is quite telling. it wasn't there, you know, in the past. >> thank you. >> yes, i'd like to know how -- i'm abigail woodward and the like to know how women's rights are being protected and advanced. and i like to know if the muslim brotherhood is seen as the main impediment to that, and other constitutions are including them? >> let's start perhaps with
the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> the un vote comes after a week of a cease fire. the president needs the vote to boost his own authority but the united states said any hope of restarting peace talks between israel and palestine would be set back. reporting live from washington dc. allison burns. >> all right. today the president invites romney for lunch at white house. during his victory speech election night he said he would reach out to romney. white house said it's no specific agenda for the meeting but the president will talk about romney's ideas for making the government more efficient. >>> first lady has revealed the white house christmas decorations. she said this year's theme is joy for all. >> the joy of giving and service to others, the joy of sharing our blessings with one another and of course the joy of welcoming our friends and families as guests in to our homes over these next several weeks. >> now the guests invited to the white house were military families and their children. that's beautiful. this year the white house has 54 christmas trees. volunteers take
relations with israel, the role of the security council and in the city council in the u.n. almost everything important is at stake in this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at in the wind while this year is critical we have to realize this isn't all about some misunderstanding or fixable problem with iran not to getting about its civil nuclear program or even its nuclear weapons program colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we and the rest of the region has with iran at least since the 1970's and this confrontation will go on regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or have a strike to prevent iran from moving to that nuclear weapons capability. we are going to have to deal with this problem over the longer term just as we have the last 30 years because it flows from kuran's view of its role in the region and the inconsistency of the view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values and our role both in t
. s. -- un security council held a closed- door consultation instead. following the consultations, members heard a report from the secretary. this is 50 minutes. >> a meeting of the security council is called to order. the provisional agenda of this meeting is the situation in the middle east, including the palestinian question. the agenda is adopted. the security council will now begin its consideration of item number two of the agenda. on behalf of the council, i welcome the secretary general, his excellency, mr. ban ki-moon who is joining the conversation at via telephone conference. i now give the floor to the secretary. >> thank you, distinguished members of the council, excellencies, ladies and gentleman. thank you for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a
vowing to block u.n. ambassador susan rice is she is nominated by the president to be the n-secretary of state. graham said he doesn't trust her because she went on tv after the attack at the u.s. consulate with information he says simply turned out to be false. >> something else i want to ask you about. there are three separate hearings going on on the issue of benghazi. yet, senators mccain and lindsey graham want a watergate style select committee hearing on this affair. what is that, and is it likely to happen? >> they're saying there are too many different committees and disparate committees investigating. they call it stove piping and they want it to be all consolidated into one special select committee. watergate was an example. they also give the example of the 9/11 commission. is that likely to happen? the answer at this point is likely no because even the top republican in congress, house speaker john boehner yesterday threw cold water on it saying he doesn't think it's necessary and the top democrat in the senate says the same thing, and others, as well. i have to
, sort it all out. he will also say he had his own talking points separate from u.n. ambassador susan rice. that came from somewhere other in the administration than his direct talking point. so he wants to get all this sorted out. he believes it was the al qaeda sympathizer group ansar al sharia that was responsible for the attacks. >> so the question, barbara, is he is convinced that the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi had nothing, nothing to do with that anti-muslim video that'd been posted on youtube, that this was a terrorist attack by this al qaeda affiliated organization. the question is though, when did he reach that final conclusion? did he know that before susan rice, the u.s. ambassador to the united nations went on those five sunday shows and insisted what happened in benghazi was the result of spontaneous anger from that anti-muslim video? >> all the i can tell you, wolf, is this source says the intelligence reports that came in blaming the video, those 20 or so reports, this source says petraeus had those reports disproved over time after he testified or rather
lines and he let us in front of the u.n., here is our red line during enrichment. where is the red line in terms of aggression shown by gaza, by hamas. >> look, the problem with hamas didn't start yesterday. we're dealing with an organization that is not willing to accept israel's right to exist. so, obviously, there are no easy solutions. when you're facing an enemy who is not even willing to recognize your right to exist, doesn't even value the same values, does it celebrate life, nutures the culture of death and they're actually saying it. all you have to do is read their charter and see what they think about israel and what they think about the united states. >> when you look at the map, it is of course, tells the picture, the whole story, when you look where israel is and what it's surrounded by, more importantly, you get a sense of how frightening that situation is for israel. here is the question though, when you have egypt, when you have tunisia, when you have turkey, all democratically elected government. all u.s. allies, appearing to support hamas, what does that do to your po
. the un, everybody involved. egypt trying to broker peace also. what does the president need to do to move this process forward? >> he needs to get engaged. he needs to get engaged very seriously. i was struck this morning by looking at the papers, at the consensus expressed by "the washington post" editorial, which is very good, sometimes i disagree with them, but it's very good today, and a couple columnists on the op-ed page, and they all say the same thing which i endorse. namely, this is a real challenge to get at the heart of the problems. if we simply patch this up, somehow or other, between hamas and israel, be if we still patch it up a little bit between the palestinian authority and israel, we'll have a repetition in no time flat. but in the meantime two things are happening in the region, which are not going to be reversed easily. u.s. influence is declining, arab radicalism is intensifying. and that's not a good thing either for stability or the future of israel. >> how does the president engage most constructively to try to reverse at least one of those two trends to stop the
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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